What You Can Get Away With » World

If you fancy the prospect of working with me, Sir Bob Russell MP and other Liberal Democrats in Colchester, then you might want to look at this job advert for a new organiser and parliamentary assistant.

Fracking

I’ve had a number of residents contact me recently regarding fracking, and whether there’ll be any taking place in the Colchester area. Having looked into the issue, it looks very unlikely that there’ll be any taking place in East Anglia, as the geology of this area means it’s very unlikely to contain any shale gas – or, at least, any significant amounts that would be economically viable to explore for and extract.

However, if someone decided they wanted to try, they’d have to first get themselves approved by the Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC) to explore and extract gas. A license to do so in this area would then have to be granted by Essex County Council who are responsible for minerals extraction – this normally involves quarrying in this area, but would include other mining operations if someone wanted to try them – and finally, Colchester Borough Council would have to grant planning permission for any surface works involved in the operation. So, even if there were deposits here that might be accessible by fracking, there’d be plenty of opportunities for the public to have their say before anything began.

As for the principle of fracking itself, I’m still waiting to see something conclusive from the evidence. As I understand it, burning gas for power produces fewer greenhouse gases than burning coal or oil for the equivalent amount of power, but the supposed cost benefits of shale gas are not likely to be that great – from what I’ve read, gas prices dropped in the US after shale gas production started because it’s mostly separate from the global gas market, so a surge in production there affected the domestic price. However, the UK and Europe are an integral part of that market, so increases in production won’t have as big an effect on the overall market price. There’s also the question of what effect such production has on the local environment.

However, beyond those considerations, there’s the global effect of continuing to extract carbon-based fuels from the ground and release that carbon into the atmosphere. This article provides a good overview of how we’re heading for a massive overshoot of carbon targets, and even if gas does release less carbon than oil or coal, if the oil and coal it displaces in the short term is still burnt, then it all goes into the atmosphere in the long run. For me, it seems that fracking is a minor distraction in the wider vision of how we reduce the amount of greenhouse gases we release before it’s far too late.

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In memory of Mel Smith

Possibly the only Alas Smith and Jones sketch to involve Colchester:

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Just a short post to let people know that Colchester Liberal Democrats now have our own page on Facebook, which should have plenty of updates and discussion from our council group. If you want to like it and get updates from us, then click here and don’t forget there are also pages for Sir Bob Russell and a certain Cllr Nick Barlow.

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Earlier this week, I was interviewed by the Colchester Gazette in my new role as group leader. Unfortunately, they didn’t put the article online, but as I own a copy of the paper, a pair of scissors and a scanner, here it is:
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You can click on the image to see it in a readable size. The headline wasn’t exactly something I said, but otherwise I think it generally reflects the conversation I had with James.

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As the Gazette is reporting it, it must be official – I’m the new leader of the Liberal Democrat group on Colchester Borough Council.

First, the thanks – thanks to the group for backing me and selecting me as their leader, and thanks to my predecessor as group leader, Councillor Paul Smith, for the work he did during his time in the role. It’s a big role to take on, and I’m glad that they see me as the best person to do the job and take the group forward.

As leader, I want to change and improve the way we communicate with the people of Colchester. The election results from last week – and especially the low turnouts – are a message to all politicians of all parties that we need to do much better at listening to people. This means us getting out on the doorstep even more than we do now, but also expanding the way we use other methods of communications. I’ll be continuing to use this blog, my existing Twitter accounts and my Facebook page, but look out for more of that coming along over the coming months.

This isn’t about us coming out to tell you how wonderful we are, but about finding out what needs fixing in your street or in your neighbourhood, and how you want to see the borough developing in the next five, ten or twenty years. I want to show that our liberal values and principles can deliver the Colchester that people want to see, that we’ve got a vision for the future of the borough that people share.

Hopefully, I’ll have many more posts on these themes over the next few months, looking for your views on various areas, but if you’ve got any questions for me, then ask them here, on twitter or facebook, or by email, and I’ll answer them as best I can. And if you feel like coming along on the journey with me, you can always join us…

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These are the results for Colchester in the Essex County Council elections. Full results can be found on the Essex County Council website.

Abbey: Lib Dem (Margaret Fisher) 1273, UKIP 786, Labour 519, Green 467, Conservative 395. LD hold
Constable: Conservative (Anne Brown) 2075, UKIP 1471, Labour 504, Green 387, Lib Dem (Carolyn Catney) 303. Con hold.
Drury: Conservative (Sue Lissimore) 1957, Lib Dem (Nick Cope) 1127, UKIP 951, Labour 527, Green 314. Con hold.
Maypole: Labour (Dave Harris) 1665, Lib Dem (Lyn Barton) 933, UKIP 573, Conservative 475, Green 143. Labour gain from Lib Dem.
Mersea and Tiptree: Conservative (John Jowers) 1913, UKIP 1134, Labour 629, Green 216, Lib Dem (Gill Collings) 181. Con hold.
Mile End and Highwoods: Lib Dem (Anne Turrell) 1417, Conservative 888, UKIP 725, Labour 408, Green 180. Lib Dem hold.
Parsons Heath and East Gates: Lib Dem (Theresa Higgins) 1259, UKIP 809, Conservative 609, Labour 489, Green 192. Lib Dem hold.
Stanway and Pyefleet: Conservative (Kevin Bentley) 1723, UKIP 929, Lib Dem (Jessica Scott-Boutell) 829, Labour 491, Green 247. Conservative hold.
Wivenhoe St Andrew: Labour (Julie Young) 1895, UKIP 599, Conservative 562, Lib Dem (Shaun Boughton) 383, Green 248. Labour hold.

I’ve been informed of the following opportunity by Colchester Arts Centre. If you know of anyone who might be interested, please pass it on to them!

Paid Work Experience Placements Available
to those currently not in employment, education or training.
Front of House, Stewarding, Bar work, Backstage.
Ages 18 – 19.
6 month contracts.
25 hours per week.
£4.98 per hour.
Please apply with a cv and covering letter. Deadline Tuesday 19th March.
We would like to hear about why you would like to work in a performing arts venue.
No previous experience required.
Applications by email to Stafford Glover: staff@colchesterartscentre.com

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You can tell I’ve got a new toy to play with – here’s a couple of videos I shot yesterday from the launch of Colchester Comedy Festival, featuring Anthony Roberts of Colchester Arts Centre and Miss High Leg Kick abseiling off the side of the Town Hall.


For more on the festival, see their website, Facebook or Twitter.

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In what is almost definitely an historical first, the Pope has taken an idea from a monarch of the Netherlands and announced that he’ll be resigning. Not because of any scandals, but because he believes that his age and health “are no longer suited to an adequate exercise of the Petrine ministry.”

A thought that came to mind after Queen Beatrix had announced her abdication was that the Dutch appear to be very sensible on this issues. Both her mother and grandmother had abdicated when they felt they were too old to continue doing the role properly, and there doesn’t appear to have been any widespread objection in the Netherlands to her actions.

Obviously, the papacy is somewhat different, but it and monarchies share a similar function of being positions that were created as jobs for life when life tended to be a lot shorter than it is for many people in the 21st century. Even leaving aside the fact that the roles were much more dangerous to hold in the past – monarchs aren’t marching into battle and Popes aren’t waking up to find invading armies at the gates of Rome – it’s only historically recently that living well past your 70th birthday has become common, even in the aristocracy.

Given the level of medical care available to popes and monarchs, it shouldn’t be a surprise to anyone that they’re living for a lot longer than they used to. However, will that extra longevity then create more situations like that of the Pope where he ends up feeling too old to continue in the role? And while the papacy has tended in recent centuries to be held solely by older men, will we come to a situation where being a monarch is seen as something a person does at the end of their life? While the Dutch seem to have perfect the sensible succession, how many other of Europe’s next monarchs are likely to come to the throne in their mid-40s and how many will find themselves at retirement age, still waiting for their turn?

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