Update: You know what they say about something being too good to be true? Yes, this was. Nicely done fake, though.

The Mayor of Baltimore responds to Chris Grayling’s comments, and proves that she’s got a sense of humour. Or humor, given that she’s American.

o present a television show as the real Baltimore is to perpetuate a fiction that dishonours our city. It is as pointless as boasting that Baltimore has a per capita homicide rate a fraction of that in the popular UK television show Midsomer Murders.

(via Liberal Conspiracy)
At this rate, I give it a week before Boris Johnson is putting out a statement claiming responsibility for the fact that London hasn’t suffered an alien attack at Christmas since he was elected.

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Amongst the Guardian letters today, Godfrey Eland wonders:

Having carefully read about Greyhound buses coming to the UK (Report, 20 August), I am at a loss to understand how these buses will be any different from National Express, Megabus or any other of the existing services on our motorways. Can someone enlighten me as to what all the fuss is about?

The fuss, of course, is quite simple to explain. Whil your average travel journalist would never think of travelling anywhere by coach in Europe – after all, why slum it with the plebs for days on end when you can just hop on an EasyJet to your destination? – they’re quite likely to have taken at least one journey in the US on a Greyhound coach, possibly going between Los Angeles and Las Vegas whilst wearing a trucker-style baseball cap in an ironic fashion. They’ll have hundreds ofways of telling the story about the slightly strange man who sat near them at the bus station, but they’d probably look at you blankly if you asked them where you get a bus from in this country.

Meanwhile, of course, their American counterparts – who’d never take a Greyhound, especially when you can fly so cheaply with Southwest – are no doubt lamenting just why they can’t have those cool National Express coaches over there.

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Enough people have linked to the latest stop on Tory MEP Daniel Hannan’s ‘Look at me, America! Look at me!’ tour – an appearance with bloviating imbecile Glenn Beck – that I thought I ought to take a look. And I managed a couple of minutes before the urge to smash my head against a wall – though at least I could get the NHS to deal with that without them claiming that my medical insurance doesn’t cover me for self-inflicted injuries – became too strong to allow me to continue.

But, in that time, I learnt something. Mainly that while many people may hold to the belief that the plural of anecdote is not data, for Hannan the singular of it definitely is, with his tale of his friend with a broken ankle’s experience of an NHS A&E Department on a Friday night enough to damn not just the NHS, but the entire idea that American healthcare needs reforming in any way.

Let’s break down this tale of Hannan’s. First, he doesn’t tell us that his friend is a medical professional, but he appears to have self-diagnosed his broken ankle, and got to A&E all by himself – note that there’s no mention of an ambulance in this story. So, at one of the busiest times in the week for A&E, someone presents themselves at reception with what seems to be a non-critical case. With there not being a line of doctors and nurses waiting at reception to diagnose and triage patients immediately on their arrival – they were probably spending their time with people who were inconsiderately in danger of death whilst earning less than Hannan’s friend – he’s told to wait, and most likely take a seat, while they arrange for one of the finite number of medical professionals they have to come and see him. Remember – this is at the busiest time of the week.

Now, this isn’t good enough for our intrepid hero who demands that they give him – with his amazing powers of self-diagnosis – painkillers there and then. Now, the worst I’ve ever done to my ankle is sprain it, and I suspect breaking it hurts a lot more, so you’d probably want painkillers that are somewhat stronger than the ones you can buy in Boots. When the receptionist – most likely not a medical professional – says they can’t just give them out on demand, and there are many many reasons why no competent medical institution in any country would do that, Hannan’s friend demands that they sell him painkillers, yet they won’t do that. And for Hannan, this is a damnation of the NHS, not a triumph for a responsible member of NHS staff.

Let’s look at it from the perspective of the A&E worker – someone comes in, insists they have a broken ankle, refuses to wait to see a member of the medical staff and insists you give them painkillers. When you refuse, they start offering you money in order to get them. Now, is this the action of a responsible member of society with remarkable skills in self-diagnosis, or could it be a clever addict attempting to get hold of some prescription drugs with a vaguely-clever if unoriginal ruse? Even if we assume that you recognise that the man is a friend of Daniel Hannan’s and thus a totally sane and upstanding member of the community, do you – not being trained to prescribe drugs to random members of the public – give him some anyway, sure that whatever you give him will do the job required and not cause any undesirable side-effects or allergic reactions?

Is Hannan claiming the situation is different in American hospitals? Having only limited knowledge of them, I can’t say for sure, but I’m pretty sure that emergency rooms – even at their busiest times, when Americans are indulging in their ‘quaint custom’ of shooting each other on every night of the week, not just Friday – don’t just dish out prescription painkillers to anyone with a handful of cash who claims to have a broken ankle.

But then, we are talking about a discussion between Daniel Hannan and Glenn Beck, so we’re at a level where reality as you or I might understand has been left far behind.

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Now, I’m not a financial expert, but I’d like to give you a little bit of financial advice. If you’re investing any money following the recommendations of Investor’s Business Daily, I’d strongly advise you to reassess those investments.

Why? Because they’ve printed what may be one of the all-time great moronic statements in the history of the Internets, one so caked in ultimate wrongness that you can’t help but question just how they manage to turn computers on, let alone publish a website and financial advice. The context is in a discussion of the latest proposals for health care reform in the US, a debate that I’ve only been following peripherally, so can’t say how the rest of the article stacks up in the whole ‘truth vs oh-my-god-you-really-believe-that-nonsense’ stakes. (The article I got the link from seems to think it’s slightly bonkers overall).

But, let us cut to the chase and the idiocy you came here for. Strap yourself in and read this:

People such as scientist Stephen Hawking wouldn’t have a chance in the U.K., where the National Health Service would say the life of this brilliant man, because of his physical handicaps, is essentially worthless.

Yes, someone wrote that, someone edited it and approved it to go out in the name of Investor’s Business Daily. Others have put it on the Internet and kept it there for well over a week, allowing the whole world to gaze at the stupid.

So remember – if you’re ever tempted to follow their investment advice: remember the stupid, and look after your money.

(Thanks to Mark on Facebook for the original link)

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The President of the United States swears like a trooper.

By random chance looking through some old posts here, I found a link to this from July 2003:

Finally, one of you asked if there would be a White House blog. Why not?

(Howard Dean, guest-posting on Lawrence Lessig’s blog)

It only took five and a half years to happen…

The election’s not over for John McCain. His website is still urging people to go and vote…(image here for when they get round to updating it)

I remember Kurt Vonnegut, who didn’t make it this far. So it goes.

“You were sick, but now you’re well again, and there’s work to do.”

Back in the mid-1980s, young comics genius Frank Miller used a unique sort of mental alchemy to tell a story that would become legend.

The story of an aging warrior, dragging himself from a restful retirement to fight once more: possibly senile, definitely psychotic, obsessed with reclaiming past glories with no thought to the consequences.

Due to political pressure, Miller was forced to subvert his own dream, applying his astonishing sense of realpolitik to the debased literature of comic books.

We are proud to at last bring his staggering vision to full and revolutionary life.

McCain: The Mavericking Maverick Mavericks More (and yes, you may not get the joke if you haven’t read this)

I didn’t expect you to be getting beat by John McCain and a Lancôme rep who thinks “The Flintstones” was based on a true story, so let’s call it even.

Barack Obama gets some advice from President Bartlett.