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A Brief History Of The Yemen Clusterf*ck – A useful primer and historical background to help you make sage and expert comments about the latest flashpoint.
The deficit: It’s a productivity thing – Failing to acknowledge lower productivity in the British economy isn’t helping economic debate make any more sense.
My Lib Dem ambivalence – James Graham explains his current issues with the party.
Floating voters: How living on a houseboat meant I didn’t officially ‘exist’ – Beyond the issues with registering to vote, there are some very interesting facts in this story about the number of people living in ‘alternative arrangements’.
Dan Hannan isn’t even wrong on the history of poverty – Left Outside on “around 900 words of nonsense from Dan Hannan. He’s a politician, I am sure of that because he definitely can’t be a historian.”

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Scotland’s colour revolution? – “It’s belatedly struck me that many features of the Yes campaign, and its post-referendum continuation in the SNP surge, come sharply into focus if you see what’s going on as a colour revolution against Labour Scotland.” Ken MacLeod offers an interesting take on Scottish politics.
The Tories want to give away houses to make sure we have enough houses – Jonn ‘build more bloody houses’ Elledge on the idiocy of the Tory plans to extend Right To Buy to housing associations.
Revealed: how British voters’ political mood swings – John Bartle of the University of Essex’s latest research on how the ‘policy mood’ of the voting public swings in an opposite direction to the Government.
The Unbearable Angst of being Britain – We need to decide what we want Britain to be in the world before we get obsessed with the minutiae of defence spending, says Tim Oliver, otherwise we’re having a meaningless debate.
Why did Brussels become the capital of Europe? Because Belgium starts with letter B! – Brussels’ role as the capital of Europe came about as an accident, inheriting the role when no one could agree on an alternative.

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Who wants to be a millionaire? Peter Oborne on Tony Blair – “Something has gone wrong with our national life and the sad story of Tony Blair helps to illustrate the scale of the problem.”
Controlling the past – The British and Greek economies were not in the same position in 2010, and the lack of challenge to this claim has let George Osborne get away with far too much, according to Simon Wren-Lewis.
Labour’s new identity policy – Alan Finlayson for Renewal on the lack of any real theory behind the bluster of Labour policy proposals.
Ours to Master – Automation is both an instrument of employer control and a necessary precondition for a post-scarcity (and possibly post-work) society.
Ramshackle coalition of interests: Black Country edition – Alex Harrowell does some digging around the Afzal Amin affair and discovers some very interesting connections behind the scenes.

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The Ulster Question – A good summary of the situation in the Northern Irish seats at the start of the General Election campaign.
Why there won’t be a Labour-SNP coalition – Interesting analysis from Alex Harrowell about the difference between establishment In parties and challenging Out parties.
A shortage of optimism – Lewis Baston on the electoral and policy problems that haunt both major parties.
Grant Shapps is a lying liar who tells lies – Just in case you had any doubts, Tim Ireland exposes the full details of Shapps’ mendacity.
A troubling attitude to statistics – Jonathan Portes of the NIESR explains how the Government’s claims of £1.2bn in savings from the Troubled Families Programme are based more on wishful thinking than any sound methods.

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Philip K. Dick was right: we are becoming androids – “The deep problem, for Dick, wasn’t that mechanisms might become more manlike. It’s that men might be reduced to mechanisms.”
Why I Just Cancelled My Direct Debit To The Electoral Reform Society – Andrew Hickey on how their shilling for online voting has lost them his support.
Because good people doing bad things does not happen only in sepia – Crooked Timber’s Maria Farrell on the flaws in Britain’s defence and security policies, highlighted by Philip Hammond’s recent speech.
China’s Tensions With Dalai Lama Spill Into The Afterlife – The Dalai Lama says he may not reincarnate. Showing an unexpected interest in theological matters, the Chinese Government and Communist Party insist he will.
The lost key to the crown jewels – How English cricket was lost to terrestrial television, and then kept away from it, no matter how good for it the return might be.

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Doorsteps, Dogs and Doughnuts – A Dozen Worst and Best Election Moments – I think many of us will have sone election memories similar to the ones Alex Wilcock recounts here.
Could a ‘citizen’s income’ work? – A long and detailed report looking into the issue from the Joseph Rowntree foundation.
Global warming and the death of a magical sports tradition – How a change in the climate has made an epic Dutch ice skating challenge very unlikely to ever happen again.
Wherefore art thou, Honest Abe? – It’ll take more than a few words from a Great Man of history to keep the United Kingdom together, according to Lallands Peat Worrier.
Why UK politicians could learn a lot from the Pirate party – I personally think the Pirate bubble has burst (not that it ever inflated much in Britain) but the wider points Paul Mason makes here about the people having vision while the politicians are obsessed with minutiae are good.

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The ‘cost’ bias – Chris Dillow explains how a lot of our understanding of how much something might cost the economy is completely wrong.
The robots are coming – John Lanchester in the LRB on how automation is changing everything around us.
Die Another Eh: What Does It Mean Now That James Bond Is In The Public Domain In Canada? – It’s almost as though copyright law has been set up to be as confusing and stifling of creativity as possible.
American democracy is doomed – Slightly incendiary title for a piece that’s arguing the current structure of American democracy needs to change, but sums up a lot of the problems with how American democracy (doesn’t) work. The problem isn’t having a constitution, it’s having that constitution seen as a near-sacred text that can’t be jettisoned and replaced.
A mayor for all seasons? – Professor Colin Talbot argues that devolution to Greater Manchester and the imposition of an elected Mayor is following the model of previous British government blunders.

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