Some of the more interesting takes on the election:

My traumatised Liberal Democrat party must rediscover its radical heart – David Boyle on the way forward for the party
Random thoughts on the election – James Graham has a few of them
Three more years of Cameron – but it will be a rocky road ahead – Very interesting analysis and prediction from the LSE’s Patrick Dunleavy
The vision thing – “is it possible to combine both popularity and intellectual coherence?” asks Chris Dillow
Back from the election – Anthony Wells looks at what the polls might have got wrong
And that’s that – “The trouble with lefties, and I say this out of love, is that we give a shit about integrity. Do you think the Right care about lies? They couldn’t give a shit if their leaders kicked you in the face and set fire to the rabbit hutch; they’re born to rule and that’s their place. Know your place, peasant. Nice one centurion. They lead and we vote for them, and that’s the way it will always be. If their leaders somehow forget to deliver something they promise or – it happens – completely lie about something, they just keep on plodding on. So what? They’re born to rule.”

I’ll add more as I see them.

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Worth Reading 171: Titanium dioxide

Hopefully coming out before the election, otherwise some of these may look quite dated…

There’s nothing new about nationalism – Naomi Lloyd-Jones in History Today on the parallels between this election and the political fighting over Irish nationalism in the 1880s.
A Very British Coup – Dan Rebellato’s take on the Tory narrative and its efforts to keep David Cameron in Downing Street.
The Disappointing Election: Britain Votes – An interesting overview of party campaigning styles and practices from Seth Thevoz.
Ciaran Toland on Naomi Long – A spirited defence and call to action for the Alliance Party’s only MP, facing a massive fight to hold East Belfast against the DUP. “The people of East Belfast are being offered a clear choice about the future of Northern Ireland. Their choice will send a message to the province, and to the world, about how Northern Ireland sees itself in 2015.”
Why I’m resisting the Conservatives’ war on foreign intellectuals in Britain – A reminder of just what ‘controls on immigration’ mean for people who want to live and work in the UK.

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Worth Reading 170: The highest checkout

UK election spells the end for the biggest ‘law’ in political science – Patrick Dunleavy on the end of the two-party system (partly saved as it’ll be useful for my dissertation)
Economics for politicians – Chris Dillow on seven principles of economics that aren’t grasped by politicians.
Game of Fear – The real story behind ‘Gamergate': one man’s obsession with ruining his ex-girlfriend’s life.
“Serious” politics – Chris Dillow again, this time on how politics insists certain ideas are sensible and others aren’t, regardless of whether it’s justified.
A letter from the hearse chasers – A personal tale from Jamie at Blood and Treasure, showing what effect cuts have on the social context of public services.

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Worth Reading 169: The absurdity of fatalism

14 things I desperately want to hear a candidate say before this campaign ends – And they’re 14 things Jonn Elledge probably won’t hear.
The Cambridge Election: Princess Bride Style – Excellent exploration of an individual voters dilemma in choosing who to vote for.
Mediamacro myth 6: 2013 recovery vindication – Simon Wren-Lewis’s latest post on bad reporting and understanding of economics issues, but you should read his entire series of posts.
Why So Many Americans Feel So Powerless – Robert Reich on an issue I’ve been thinking about recently – how the modern economy and modern society leaves so many feeling they have no power over anything.
Sacked for speaking your mind? Don’t expect the free speech brigade to help – An Australian story, so some of the references might not be clear, but the important point is about how libertarians obsess over state power while letting corporations do whatever they want.

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Worth Reading 168: Perfection multiplied

Tony Blair is right on Europe – Jonathan Calder makes some wise points on how a referendum on Europe would be a disaster for this country.
Try, try again – Why forcing tests on children and telling them they’re failures repeatedly, isn’t good for them.
Mediocre Failures – Another take on why expecting some children to be branded as failures is a terrible idea.
Is the future of America a crummy service job stamping on a human face, forever? – When Presidential candidates from both sides seem to think nobody is complete without a job, is there another way?
‘Distraction is a kind of obesity of the mind’ – Interesting Guardian interview with writer Matthew Crawford about how quiet space has become another commodity available only to the wealthy.

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Worth Reading 167: Starting backgammon

Grayling: the Lord Chancellor who told the High Court to disregard the Rule of Law – Jack of Kent on the latest decision of Chris Grayling’s to be overturned by the courts. This time, he believes that because he makes the law, he can ignore it.
Why Henry George had a point – When the Economist is praising the idea of a land value tax, you begin to wonder if things might be shifting somewhat.
The many faces of Tatiana Maslany – Interesting interview/profile of the Orphan Black star and her acting process.
Tales from the Trenches: I was SWATed – And now the supposed ‘ethics in gaming journalism’ arseholes of Gamergate are trying to get police SWAT teams called out on people who criticise them.
The Lib Dems’ big problem: and how to solve it – Liberal Democrats need to build a vision based on social liberalism if the party is going to grow in the future.

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Worth Reading 166: War with the Parthians, before and after

A Brief History Of The Yemen Clusterf*ck – A useful primer and historical background to help you make sage and expert comments about the latest flashpoint.
The deficit: It’s a productivity thing – Failing to acknowledge lower productivity in the British economy isn’t helping economic debate make any more sense.
My Lib Dem ambivalence – James Graham explains his current issues with the party.
Floating voters: How living on a houseboat meant I didn’t officially ‘exist’ – Beyond the issues with registering to vote, there are some very interesting facts in this story about the number of people living in ‘alternative arrangements’.
Dan Hannan isn’t even wrong on the history of poverty – Left Outside on “around 900 words of nonsense from Dan Hannan. He’s a politician, I am sure of that because he definitely can’t be a historian.”

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