Category Archives

Archive of posts published in the category: Politics

Basic Income is the key to creating a liberal society

Mark Pack has written about his thoughts on whether Basic Income (or Citizen’s Income, as it was called when it was party policy in the 90s) should be Liberal Democrat policy again. He’s going off the idea of it, because he thinks you…

New academic research project on political party members

Here’s an interesting new academic research project: the ESRC Party Members Project. Their description of the project is: By collecting original quantitative and qualitative data, the project explores party membership’s supply side (the members themselves and what they do and think) and its…

What if Labour split? A Liberal Democrat perspective

I’m still of the opinion that while a formal split in the Labour Party is possible, it’s not likely to happen. There are three options for those Labour MPs and members currently dissatisfied with the direction of the party: stay there, bunker down…

Taking student politics far too seriously

It feels like barely a day goes by at the moment without some corner of social media getting worked up about something that’s happened at a university. The Student Union at the University of West Loamshire fails to pass a motion condemning bad…

The Oldham West and Royton result in (Labour) context

Just to provide some comparable insight into the result in the Oldham West and Royton by-election last night, here’s how Labour did in held seat by-elections during the last Parliament. I’m looking at their vote in isolation to give us a picture of…

Could the Labour Party split?

British political parties are very resilient and flexible institutions. Since the modern party system came into being after 1945 there’s only been one permanent major split in a party, when the SDP separated from Labour in 1981. People – and that includes me…

Timequakes, Zugzwang and bombing Syria

Timequake, Kurt Vonnegut’s last novel, is an odd thing. The story is ostensibly about the world having to relive the years from 1991 to 2001 all over again, with full memory of everything we did during that time but unable to change any…

Writing elsewhere

My post from last week on devolution got some attention, and a rewritten version of is now available on CityMetric. Related PostsWorth Reading 184: Abandoning the Antonine Wall Slouching towards post-democracy Worth Reading 176: The Gliese with a planet George Osborne has some…

Can accountability bridge devolution’s gap between identity and practicality?

Over on CityMetric, Jonn Elledge writes that devolution is meant to be about practicality and delivery, and wonders why questions of identity are mixed up in it. I think there’s a problem with phrasing the debate in that way because both sides of…

What happens next for Labour?

I should say at the start that this will be a post with a lot of questions and not many answers. Sometimes it can be easy to get an idea of where a party will go by looking at their history and the…

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