What You Can Get Away With » Why we need better announcement of election results

Despite the fact I think that we shouldn’t be having Police and Crime Commissioners, I’m finding it hard to ignore the announcement of results that’s going on today. The electoral geek in me has come out, especially as the news I’m hearing from the Essex count is very interesting – the Conservative candidate has a lead after the first round, but the independent Mick Thwaites might be able to close that gap with second preferences. Results from across the districts show that the other independent candidate, Linda Belgrove, has also done well.

The problem, though, is that this information is coming from what people who are at the count are tweeting. Officially, none of this is available to the wider world until the result is announced, and even then the announcement will just be the basic result for the whole county, not the breakdown by district. (As happens with European elections, the district-level results may be released later)

This is the way all our elections get counted, with all the votes cast for a post announced together, and from what I understand it’s another way in which Britain stands alone. In other countries, votes are counted by where they’re cast, these results are announced and then aggregated together to give an overall result. This is what we saw in the US election a fortnight ago, with results being declared by precinct (roughly equivalent to a British polling district), and most of those announcements being made online on an official election site. This is why US media have the ability to call states before counts are completed – from seeing the results as they come in, they can project the result for the rest of the state.

Over here, though, that information isn’t announced, and we all must wait until the full result is announced. Surely it’s not beyond the ability of returning officers to arrange counting and announcement by polling district, and for the Electoral Commission to create a site or sites for these results to be announced on? (Indeed, researchers and academics would probably find a single database of all local election results very useful, rather than having to scrape them from individual council sites)

Declaring results by district would give everyone a lot more information – not just who won where, but how turnout varies across an election – and would likely make election counts and declarations more interesting. What would we need to do to make it happen?

Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Bookmark this on Digg
Share on reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Yahoo Bookmark

, ,
Trackback

no comment untill now

Sorry, comments closed.