I only returned to proper regular blogging in July of this year, when I started my series of Conrad Russell and liberalism posts, but it’s been a good year of blogging overall. I’ve got some attention since I’ve come back – I’m apparently the 7th most influential ‘other’ blog in the UK, though still not a political one according to Teads – and also picked up a nomination for Liberal Democrat Blog of the Year (which went to the much more deserving Jonathan Calder).

Thanks to everyone who visited, read, commented, linked or otherwise interacted with the blog during 2014, and hopefully 2015 will see a whole year of regular posting, not just six months of it. Let’s see what the most popular posts of 2014 were, shall we?

10) There’s been at least one former Prime Minister in Parliament since 1756, but could that end next year? – This came from a random thought that struck me after Gordon Brown announced his retirement, and the research for it didn’t take as long as I thought it would. Even if it doesn’t happen this year, I suspect the changing nature of the House of Lords and the tendency of former PMs to not hang around the Commons mean it won’t be long before it does.
9) The tribalism of the One True Party is why people are turned off by politics – One thing I’ve been thinking a lot over the last few months is how party politics in the UK is very close to being utterly broken. This is just one symptom of it: the passionate intensity some believe in their cause with.
8) A few thoughts on UKIP vote shares and their chances in 2015 – Written before the Carswell defection, so outdated in some respects, but I do think there’s an interesting avenue of study in the effects of differential turnouts.
7) Something Must Be Done About Boris – I’ve noticed that public attitudes towards Boris appear to have been shifting over the past few months, as though people are beginning to see through the ‘LOL Boris’ act to the naked ambition and repulsive views that hide underneath. This post looks at how he casually suggested getting rid of the presumption of innocence, part of that tarnishing he’s brought upon himself.
6) Presidential questions response: Daisy Cooper – The 2014 Liberal Democrat presidential election generated a lot of attention over the last few months, and even though Daisy didn’t win, she did get more people reading her responses to my questions than any of the other candidates. I was impressed by Daisy’s ability to come up with detailed responses to my questions in such a short time.
5) My presidential manifesto – The post that generated the questions to the candidates, and misinterpreted by at least one person on Twitter who insisted that I shouldn’t stand for the position. I think the problems I highlighed here are still a problem with the party, and are something that needs to be addressed before wider voting for all party posts comes in – I’m not alone in wanting to see people say what they actually mean rather than hide behind boilerplate ‘hard working campaigner’ descriptions and vaguely coded rhetoric.
4) Have I Got News For You makes history – but far too late #HIGNFY – I’ve been maintaining my spreadsheet on the gender breakdown of HIGNFY guests for a while, so it was an obviously an interesting moment when the show had its first episode with a majority of women on screen, and the first all-female guest line-up since 1997. Unfortunately, this was the high point of the current series, and a chance to set a whole set of firsts was missed.
3) Worth reading extra: on #DRIP – The Data Retention and Investigatory Powers Act was rushed through Parliament because Something Had To Be Done, and sadly Liberal Democrats acquiesced in that process. This post was an attempt to gather together a bunch of information on DRIP, and why we didn’t need it, in an ultimately doomed effort to slow down that rush.
2) How did workism conquer the world? – An idea and a post that had been gestating for a while, so I’m glad it got a lot of attention and appeared to strike a chord with many people. I do need to do some more thinking and writing about workism as a concept, and how we can fight against it, but I do think this is an interesting introduction to the concept.

And so, my most popular post of 2014 was:

1) Liberal Democrats for Basic Income, anyone? – Linked to the idea of workism (and only just beating it to the number one spot by a handful of views), this did reveal I’m not alone in thinking that the idea of a basic income could be what liberalism needs to reinvent itself for the twenty-first century. Now we just have to move on and try and make it happen.

One again, thanks to the small football stadium-filling number of you that visited the blog over the past twelve months and I’m glad you found what I write to be of some interest. Hopefully, I’ll continue to keep that interest during 2015.