Transcript of all news programmes – Love and Garbage saves you from having to watch them. But they’ll no doubt have a special report to examine why you’re not watching them.
Bloody Nasty People by Daniel Trilling – review – David Edgar reviews what sounds like a fascinating book about the far-right in Britain, but the review itself makes some very good points.
Third draft struggles – Author Benjamin Rosenbaum talks about how swapping the gender of the characters in his novel gave him a whole new perspective. Given the interest this post has provoked, I think there’s a market there for a gender-swapping Scrivener plugin.

Warning: Both the next two links deal with rape and sexual abuse. They’re potentially triggering for people who’ve experienced that or other abuse, but I’ve included them because they’re definitely worth reading.
A fan letter to certain conservative politicians – I wish I could write something as good as this piece by John Scalzi. I wish the world was such that he didn’t have to write it. Again, a massive trigger warning for this piece, which is a piece of midnight-dark satire.
Beneath the law: When the system inherently favors the rapist – Reports from around the world of how those who are meant to be working for the victims of sexual crimes are failing in that responsibility.

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Wind turbine syndrome: a classic ‘communicated’ disease – I’m shocked – shocked, I tell you – to discover that something James Delingpole and other contrarian trolls believe in has no evidence to back it up.
10 myths of the UK’s far right – Daniel Trilling in the Guardian outlines some widely-repeated opinions about the BNP and their ilk that don’t stand up to much scrutiny.
Facebook friends network ‘quadruples voting behaviour’ – Interesting study in the US about different online prompts and how they increase the likelihood of someone voting – the original paper it’s based on is here.
English Baccalaureate – questions outstanding – Stephen Williams MP shows that not all Lib Dem MPs have drunk the Govite Kool-Aid.
The Myth of the European Court of Human Rights’ “War on Britain” – Very good piece by Alex Massie. Worth passing on to any nutters of your acquaintance (some of whom appear to be in the Cabinet, sadly) who advocate Britain withdrawing from/ignoring the ECHR

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And a majority that aren’t election-related.

Electoral Services: I know they’re only doing their job, but… – Jennie Rigg on the last-minute rush to get nomination papers in, which many people who’ve been candidate and/or agents will read with a few knowing nods.
How to write a generic SF novel - Paul McAuley provides some useful advice: “No matter how technologically advanced your future society might be, its sociology and economics are basically those of the seventeenth century. Also its battle tactics.”
BNP Candidates 2011 – Lancaster Unity has discovered there’s a dramatic fall in the number of candidates the BNP are standing in local elections this year, though there is a rise in former BNP candidates standing for other nationalist parties.
Russian bloggers accuse authorities of cyberwar – Twenty years ago, which of these things would have seemed the most weird: the existence of sites like LiveJournal, Russian democracy or DDOS attacks?
72 mandatory pitstops per race – Duncan Stephen has a sneak preview of the latest plans to improve Formula 1

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I’m not likely to be at Liberal Democrat Conference this year, so I’ve been spared the task of reading through any policy papers. But, whatever my gripes may be with some party policy papers, I’m sure we’d have to go some way to achieve the levels of idiocy plumbed by the BNP with the proposals on single mothers going to their conference. More discussion of the ins and outs of the policy – and some of the process by which the BNP determines its policy, including a benhind-closed-doors conference – are on the Lancaster Unity website.

As you might expect, it’s a rather staggering piece of stupidity from the BNP. According to them, the problem of housing shortages and much more can be solved by effectively imprisoning any unmarried woman under 21 who gets pregnant. There’s no mention, of course, of what happens to these women after they turn 21 and are allowed out of NotPrison with their children, nor is there any mention of the men (of whatever age) who surely played some part in the conception process, though one assumes that the staff of the NotPrisons would be happy for them to remain free, in order to ensure that they kept their jobs looking after a steady wave of pregnant teenagers.

Of course, given that it’s an insane plan based on a kneejerk reaction to create a non-solution to a perceived problem, there’s every chance it might already be being considered at some level of the Government.

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