Taken a while to put this list together, as you might be able to tell from the differing ages of the links…

Axelrod & matches – Chris Dillow uses Labour’s appointment of David Axelrod to point out that most successful management is strongly context-specific and not necessarily transferable.
Metropolitan bureaucrats ate our counties – Flip Chart Fairy Tales on just how bizarre the DCLG’s latest pronouncements on ‘historic borders’ are. The campaign for the restoration of Winchecombeshire starts…somewhere else.
The Manic Street Preachers: “I’ll always hate the Tory party. But now I hate Labour, too” – Interview with the band as their latest album is released.
The board game of the alpha nerds – An introduction to Diplomacy, which is the best, most frustrating, most challenging and most annoying game I’ve played. (If you want to try it, PlayDiplomacy.com is a good site)
What’s the point if we can’t have fun? – “Why do animals play? Well, why shouldn’t they? The real question is: Why does the existence of action carried out for the sheer pleasure of acting, the exertion of powers for the sheer pleasure of exerting them, strike us as mysterious? What does it tell us about ourselves that we instinctively assume that it is?”

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“The Bradford Earthquake”: How Bradford West was won – Excellent report by Lewis Baston for Democratic Audit on the by-election that sent George Galloway back to Parliament. Essential reading for anyone interested in British politics.
Nicholas Stern: ‘I got it wrong on climate change – it’s far, far worse’ – so, can we begin the official panic yet?
It Takes Planning, Caution to Avoid Being ‘It’ – What happens when you keep playing a game of tag for years after you left school.
‘Only a Phase’: How Diplomats Misjudged Hitler’s Rise - A look at some of the communications ambassadors to Germany were sending back to their governments in 1933.
For 40 Years, This Russian Family Was Cut Off From All Human Contact, Unaware of World War II – Fascinating tale of a Russian family who fled to the taiga to avoid Stalinist purges of the religious, then remained in complete isolation for forty years.

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