What You Can Get Away With » egypt

Yes, we still have links, even if we don’t have much other content:

The Battle for the No Campaign and a Prime Minister in Peril – Interesting WSJ piece on the AV referendum. I’d question some of the assumptions in it, but worth reading nonetheless.
Tuition Fees: Did The Coalition Get Its Sums Wrong? – Just in case you thought the whole tuition fees issue wasn’t a big enough debacle, here’s another complication.
The Beasts in the Arena – A free short story in the Romanitas universe from Sophia McDougall. Works as a good introduction to the series if you’ve not read them.
NUS President will not stand again – What I find most interesting about Free Radical’s thoughts on the NUS is that I heard most of them twenty years ago when I was involved in student politics. I’m not sure that NUS has ever been properly representative, or has ever had a strong idea of what it’s for. (via)
David Cameron: Gun Slut – Justin McKeating on what David Cameron’s doing after talking up democracy in Cairo: selling weapons to dictatorships.

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And today, we’re 80% Egyptian-related:

WorldNetDaily: The Rise of the Muslim Anti-Christ Explains Egypt Unrest – No, I’m not linking to WorldNutDaily, just to Richard Bartholomew’s analysis of another one of their bizarre conspiracy theories
Arseholes, considered as a strategic resource – Daniel Davies on how dictatorships keep themselves in power.
Why Egypt 2011 is not Iran 1979 – a very good explanation of all the differences by Juan Cole
da brother’s gonna work it out – The Yorkshire Ranter on Tony Blair’s support for Hosni Mubarak
A True Story of Daily Mail Lies – And finally, something that’s not about Egypt, but is the sad truth about how some of our media operate (via)

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Let there be linkage:

A Vision Of Foreign Policy Only Beck Can Provide – That’s Glenn Beck, but reading out the lyrics to Devil’s Haircut might make more sense. Watch the video for something that looks like a dramatic reconstruction of the thought processes of a crazed conspiracy theorist, except it’s for real (via)
A Guide: How Not To Say Stupid Stuff About Egypt – Something worth checking, just to see if you’re guilty of any of them
Soccer clubs central to ending Egypt’s ‘Dictatorship of Fear’ – Something I’ve not seen mentioned anywhere else, and interesting that all football games have been cancelled in Libya following the events in Egypt.
Prisoner votes in Scottish elections again – Are BBC journalists and government ministers bloody stupid? – Since I’ve begun reading legal bloggers like Love and Garbage, I’ve become aware of just how poorly a lot of issues are being reported in the media. Here’s another example.
How Cyclone Yasi compares around the world – An indication of just how huge the storm currently threatening Australia is.

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60% Egyptian this time.

Butwhataboutthemen? – Anton Vowl channels his inner Giles Coren
Egypt Leaves the Internet – A look at how Egyptian access to the internet was restricted
India’s most expensive movie yields most astonishingly violent and demented action-scene in cinematic history – It’s on BoingBoing, so you’ve probably seen it already, but just in case you haven’t
Revolution in North Africa – Jim Bliss has an interesting take on what’s been happening in Tunisia and Egypt
Everybody Loves Hosni – Justin shows just how popular a guy Hosni Mubarak is

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Hello world! Here are things to interest you:

Beware those who sneer at ‘human rights imperialism’ – Comment is Free finally publishes a counter-argument to their worst article of 2010. Sohrab Ahmari makes some powerful points explaining just why universal rights are important.
Browne’s Gamble – Probably linked to and seen by a lot of you back in November, but I’ve only just discovered it. A rather depressing look at what the effects of the Browne Review will be on higher education.
The barren weeks, the amnesiac years – Excellent post by Phil Edwards at The Gaping Silence on some of the posturing going on around giving prisoners the right to vote.
Egypt’s Muslims attend Coptic Christmas Mass, serving as ‘human shields’ – When the world’s feeling pretty crappy, it’s always nice to have some good news of people doing decent things for each other
Tragedy in Tucson (about five miles from my house) – One of Gabrielle Gifford’s constituents talks about her shooting and the social climate in Arizona.

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Odd story of the day comes from Peter Black:

As testimony to an enduring but rather extreme fascination with Egyptology, the mummy worshippers – many wearing robes and head-dresses – STROLL into the display room containing Tem Hor’s bandaged body and involve themselves in “unusual practices”.

Exhibitions officer Roger Gale said: “They were quite a problem before we introduced the security cameras but now they appear to have come back.

“They occasionally come to the museum on weekends and just seem to want to be in the presence of Tem Hor.

“They tend to bow low in front of the mummy case and mumble what appear to be prayers or incantations.

“The problem is they can appear quite menacing because they tend to wear strange clothes, behave rather oddly and want to stay for a long time. The display room containing Tem Hor is not big and they put other people off.

“We usually manage to get them to leave and it’s something we are keeping an eye on.”

I do love the way they’ve chosen to capitalise the most innocuous word in the story – STROLL – as though it might be quite normal behaviour as long as they strode, sprinted or walked purposefully into the room. Strolling or ambling into the presence of ancient Egyptian artefacts, though, is clearly evidence of the decline of moral fibre in the 21st century.

The best part of the story comes at the end, though:

a woman chanted before a display case of dusty Egyptian death masks, explaining: “They’re possessed by trapped ancient spirits. I must release them.”

The female visitor ignored requests to be quiet and it was only when staff at the Egypt Centre explained these particular artefacts were the modern creations of local schoolchildren taking part in a competition that she made her excuses and left.

There’s an entire series of the League of Gentlemen in that story – a bedragged Gatiss prostrate before the artefacts, Shearsmith the bemused museum director pestered by random acts of Egyptology while Pemberton teaches a class of creepily well-behaved Welsh children how to create Egyptian tomb goods, oblivious to the way their eyes glow as they work…

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