» nhs ¦ What You Can Get Away With

Common decency fail at the Huff Post – Jim Jepps on why posting pictures of David Miliband with his flies undone helps to drive politicians further away from the public.
Eastleigh – Why There’s No Farage – Because, explains Tim Fenton, despite his talk of the importance of Westminster, he’s no desire to actually be an MP.
Hurricane Sandy Aftermath: Storm Damage Vehicles – An illustration of the amount of damage done by the storm, that also prompts questions about why they’re all being disposed of.
Against Save Our Thing – Alex Harrowell explains why campaigning to save social hardware is misguided when its the software that’s under attack.
The Shard: beacon of the left’s skyline – Owen Hatherley on how the 1980s changes in local government led to the skyscrapers of today.

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Not all phone-hacking, all the time:

Paper, scissors, stone – Heresy Corner collects George Michael’s tweets on his relationship with the News Of The World, and notices that they point towards some very dodgy-sounding behaviour from the Metropolitan Police. (via)
Don’t pity Gordon – he supped from the devil’s hands – “At its core, it is an issue of the abuse of political power not by Murdoch, but by Gordon Brown, Tony Blair, David Cameron and every other elected quisling who supped with the devil not with a long spoon but from the devil’s own satanic hands.”
Dominic Grieve is a bigger scandal than Andy Coulson – How The Sun vetoed David Cameron’s choice of Shadow Home Secretary.
Test Your Vocab – Interesting test to see how many different words people are aware of, and by taking part in it, you’re helping out with some research. (36,100 for me, if you’re interested) (via)
An Eye-Opening Adventure in Socialized Medicine – An American visitor discovers the NHS (via)

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Rocket-powered octopi all the way down…

Space Stasis – Fascinating Slate article from Neal Stephenson on all the factors that had to come together to make rocketry so important
Caroline Lucas’ U-turn on taxes – It seems that Ten O’Clock Live stumbled on an exclusive as Caroline Lucas radically rewrote Green Party policy on air. Unfortunately, they were too busy coming up with the great satire of calling Harry Cole a journalist to notice
Tree octopus exposes internet illiteracy – In the spirit of this article, I would like to point out that you all owe me £100
Cracking the Scratch Lottery Code – “People often assume that I must be some extremely moral person because I didn’t take advantage of the lottery,” he says. “I can assure you that that’s not the case. I’d simply done the math and concluded that beating the game wasn’t worth my time.”
Evidence supporting your NHS reforms? What evidence, Mr Lansley? – I think I’m approximately the 9,836th person to link to this approvingly today, but if you haven’t read it from any of the 9,835 other links, here it is.

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Enough people have linked to the latest stop on Tory MEP Daniel Hannan’s ‘Look at me, America! Look at me!’ tour – an appearance with bloviating imbecile Glenn Beck – that I thought I ought to take a look. And I managed a couple of minutes before the urge to smash my head against a wall – though at least I could get the NHS to deal with that without them claiming that my medical insurance doesn’t cover me for self-inflicted injuries – became too strong to allow me to continue.

But, in that time, I learnt something. Mainly that while many people may hold to the belief that the plural of anecdote is not data, for Hannan the singular of it definitely is, with his tale of his friend with a broken ankle’s experience of an NHS A&E Department on a Friday night enough to damn not just the NHS, but the entire idea that American healthcare needs reforming in any way.

Let’s break down this tale of Hannan’s. First, he doesn’t tell us that his friend is a medical professional, but he appears to have self-diagnosed his broken ankle, and got to A&E all by himself – note that there’s no mention of an ambulance in this story. So, at one of the busiest times in the week for A&E, someone presents themselves at reception with what seems to be a non-critical case. With there not being a line of doctors and nurses waiting at reception to diagnose and triage patients immediately on their arrival – they were probably spending their time with people who were inconsiderately in danger of death whilst earning less than Hannan’s friend – he’s told to wait, and most likely take a seat, while they arrange for one of the finite number of medical professionals they have to come and see him. Remember – this is at the busiest time of the week.

Now, this isn’t good enough for our intrepid hero who demands that they give him – with his amazing powers of self-diagnosis – painkillers there and then. Now, the worst I’ve ever done to my ankle is sprain it, and I suspect breaking it hurts a lot more, so you’d probably want painkillers that are somewhat stronger than the ones you can buy in Boots. When the receptionist – most likely not a medical professional – says they can’t just give them out on demand, and there are many many reasons why no competent medical institution in any country would do that, Hannan’s friend demands that they sell him painkillers, yet they won’t do that. And for Hannan, this is a damnation of the NHS, not a triumph for a responsible member of NHS staff.

Let’s look at it from the perspective of the A&E worker – someone comes in, insists they have a broken ankle, refuses to wait to see a member of the medical staff and insists you give them painkillers. When you refuse, they start offering you money in order to get them. Now, is this the action of a responsible member of society with remarkable skills in self-diagnosis, or could it be a clever addict attempting to get hold of some prescription drugs with a vaguely-clever if unoriginal ruse? Even if we assume that you recognise that the man is a friend of Daniel Hannan’s and thus a totally sane and upstanding member of the community, do you – not being trained to prescribe drugs to random members of the public – give him some anyway, sure that whatever you give him will do the job required and not cause any undesirable side-effects or allergic reactions?

Is Hannan claiming the situation is different in American hospitals? Having only limited knowledge of them, I can’t say for sure, but I’m pretty sure that emergency rooms – even at their busiest times, when Americans are indulging in their ‘quaint custom’ of shooting each other on every night of the week, not just Friday – don’t just dish out prescription painkillers to anyone with a handful of cash who claims to have a broken ankle.

But then, we are talking about a discussion between Daniel Hannan and Glenn Beck, so we’re at a level where reality as you or I might understand has been left far behind.

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Now, I’m not a financial expert, but I’d like to give you a little bit of financial advice. If you’re investing any money following the recommendations of Investor’s Business Daily, I’d strongly advise you to reassess those investments.

Why? Because they’ve printed what may be one of the all-time great moronic statements in the history of the Internets, one so caked in ultimate wrongness that you can’t help but question just how they manage to turn computers on, let alone publish a website and financial advice. The context is in a discussion of the latest proposals for health care reform in the US, a debate that I’ve only been following peripherally, so can’t say how the rest of the article stacks up in the whole ‘truth vs oh-my-god-you-really-believe-that-nonsense’ stakes. (The article I got the link from seems to think it’s slightly bonkers overall).

But, let us cut to the chase and the idiocy you came here for. Strap yourself in and read this:

People such as scientist Stephen Hawking wouldn’t have a chance in the U.K., where the National Health Service would say the life of this brilliant man, because of his physical handicaps, is essentially worthless.

Yes, someone wrote that, someone edited it and approved it to go out in the name of Investor’s Business Daily. Others have put it on the Internet and kept it there for well over a week, allowing the whole world to gaze at the stupid.

So remember – if you’re ever tempted to follow their investment advice: remember the stupid, and look after your money.

(Thanks to Mark on Facebook for the original link)

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