The observant amongst you will have noticed that I’m not at Liberal Democrat Conference this year. I had originally intended to go, but then events (the Tour of Britain on Friday, the Free Festival yesterday and various meetings next week) got in the way and meant it wouldn’t really have been worth my while to go all the way up to Liverpool for just a day or two.

Or so I thought. When I heard I’d been nominated for a Blog of the Year award for co-creating the bizarre phenomenon that was #nickcleggsfault , I thought it was nice to be recognised but there was no way I’d win the award, and I assumed that was the general consensus from the lack of interest there was in volunteering to stand in for me at the awards. It was quite a big surprise, then, to turn my computer on this morning and discover that I’d won.

So, with thanks to Stephen Tall for standing in for me and providing a relevant excuse, here’s an approximation of what I might have said had I been there to accept the award last night:

First off, I’d like to thank Justin McKeating – while I used the phrase ‘Nick Clegg’s fault’, he was the person who put a hash in front of it while blaming Nick for stubbing his toe. However, I don’t think either of us expected it to become as explosively popular as it did.

I also feel somewhat guilty about winning this award as I did basically nothing compared to the hard work everyone else has done – I was one of the supporters of Bridget’s motion to get the Digital Economy Bill discussed at the last Conference, I’ve seen the amount of work candidates like Daisy and Tamora do even before they spend time doing digital campaigning on top of that and I’m still a member of Simon’s Vote Clegg, Get Clegg group and see how it’s continuing to generate interesting – and by the usual internet standards, fantastically polite – conversations months after the election. So, to get this award for typing 140 characters early one morning seems almost as absurd as some of the things Nick was being blamed for and so I’d also like to thank everyone out there who took part in #nickcleggsfault back in April and May – this is as much your award as it mine and Justin’s.

It’s still coming home with me and going on my mantelpiece, though.

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I’ve been nominated in the 2010 Liberal Democrat Voice Blog Of The Year Awards, which probably seems rather odd given how little blogging I’ve done in the last twelve months. And so it would be, if it was for blogging, but instead it’s for the early morning Twitter conversation with Justin that turned into a globe-spanning hashtag that even got mentioned on Newsnight.

Unaccountably, the offers to pay us large amounts of money as experts on the use of hashtags in social media have failed to materialise, and our attempts to persuade people to #SendUsMoney experienced the common Difficult Second Hashtag problem and failed to reach the same level of success. But even if I’m not going to be at the awards ceremony – I’ve too much on here to get up to Conference – I can at least display a meaningless graphic here for a while.

And remember that there’s an open vote for Best non-Liberal Democrat blog running on the LDV site now. I’d definitely urge you to vote for anyone but Tom Harris,

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As the battlebuses pull into their last stops, and the last hordes of activists run through ever-darkening streets to push that one last leaflet that might make the difference through that one last letterbox, the election finally gets handed over to the voters. Yes, at last we’ll get the answer to the question that’s been bugging us for the the past weeks, months, and years – which polling company is the most accurate? Oh, there’ll be something about a new Government at the end of it too, but that’s less important, surely.

Still, if you see your vote as being something more than doing what a random sample of people tells you, have some links. Angry Mob believe that a vote for the Liberal Democrats is telling the Daily Mail where to go. Writing for the Guardian’s Science section, Martin Robbins assesses the evidence about the parties’ science policies and states:

Which leads me to emerge from two weeks buried in paperwork and political promises to find myself at this conclusion. If I were to cast my vote based purely on science, it would be for the Liberal Democrats, for Nick Clegg and for Evan Harris.

It’s the last day of the campaign, so a couple of final digs at David Cameron. Duncan Stott wonders just what sort of interviews he prefers. And David Schneider has a final warning:

And one last video:

And no, when I sent that tweet to Justin a couple of weeks ago, I didn’t expect it to inspire so much.

As for my day, another 350 or so leaflets delivered, which takes me up to 3,800 for the campaign. Was expecting to do even more than that, but after I’d done my assigned delivery, I found out that the rest of the constituency had all been done, so I could relax for the evening. Nice to have so many volunteers, and it should make it good fun tomorrow to have a lot of people around to help get the vote out. I’m up bright and early tomorrow to do the first canvassing shift at my local polling station, and by the time the count has finished, I’ll have likely been up for over 20 hours. Not quite as much as I managed in 1997, but back then I didn’t have to go to another count – for the local elections – the day after.

Blog posting may be understandably light tomorrow, but I will likely be twittering quite a lot.

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Been somewhat out of the national election loop today, as I’ve been concentrating on working here on the campaign here in Colchester. Been glancing at Twitter on and off during the day, which has provided an interesting way of skimming the election news through an odd filter. This has included the rather odd news that Nick Clegg is not only aware of the whole #nickcleggsfault phenomenon, but regards it as one of his favourite parts of the campaign. I find myself imagining Nick Clegg being summoned to Buckingham Palace after the election, just for the Queen to tell him it’s all his fault.

Anyway, #nickcleggsfault is now so April 22nd. All the cool Tweeters are on #disobeymurdoch now. (And the really cool are on #SendUsMoney)

Meanwhile, today’s news is that there’s been a sudden surge in hysterical (in every sense of the word) bigotry. I also caught the English Democrats’ election broadcast (not intentionally, but it was stuck between Newsnight and Newsnight Review) but as it didn’t contain Steven Uncles on his knees, begging the forgiveness of the world for what he said about Chris Lightfoot’s death, I find no reason to pay them any attention at all. Except to point out that Mr Uncles is standing in Gravesham, and I hope Anna Arrowsmith beats him soundly.

Anyway, I spent most of today out running canvassing teams here in Colchester. While you don’t get to knock on any doors yourself while you’re co-ordinating it, it’s an interesting experience to be co-ordinating a group of others as they head to the doorstep and dealing with the variety of responses you can get from a single street. We also had some new people out with us tonight, and it’s fun watching someone learn the art of canvassing to the point when they’re willing and ready to go and knock on doors all by themselves. But, even though we got through a few hundred doors in those sessions, I didn’t knock on any or do any deliveries today, so no advance on the totals for now.

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I’m still not quite sure what part of today I’ve found the strangest – the news that Marmite are suing the BNP over a Party Political Broadcast, that Iain Dale wrote a post deploring the personal attacks on Nick Clegg, or the fact that a brief conversation between me and Justin on Twitter spawned a globe-spanning meme. I’m pretty sure it’s the first time a first-thing-in-the-morning off-hand comment of mine has ended up inspiring a song.

Before I forget to recommend it, some other stuff worth reading out there on the internets from Steph Ashley and Alix Mortimer.

I suppose today is the day where I can excuse my lack of activity on the local campaign by claiming I was focusing on the national/internet campaign. What I’ve found interesting during this campaign is that the party do seem to have finally understood internet campaigning and not tried to interfere with spontaneous internet uprisings. For example the people who created and turned the Rage Against The Machine Facebook group into such a phenomenon (it now has a membership almost double the party’s) have been allowed to get on with it in their own way. They’ve been given advice and support from the party when it’s been asked for – though even that’s mostly been crowdsourced – but there’s been no one from Cowley Street trying to muscle in and insist that they must do it a certain way.

There’s definitely something happening during this election as the rules change around us. Someone mentioned to me this morning that they’d heard someone – we think it was UKIP or the English Democrats – travelling around the streets in a car with a PA on it. That’s something that probably seemed like an incredible innovation 80 or 90 years, was a staple of campaigning in the 70s, but is now almost entirely gone from campaigns. Could elections in 10 or 20 years time see all the attention paid to Twitter hashtags and Facebook groups while everyone wonders why they don’t get scores of leaflets through their doors anymore?

(Quick thought: I wonder if anyone’s studied what happens to domestic paper recycling rates and amounts during election campaigns?)

On that note, I can’t remember if I’ve linked to David Yelland’s excellent Guardian article yet: Nick Clegg’s rise could lock Murdoch and the media elite out of UK politics. If you want to know why certain parts of the press are going so over-the-top in their attacks on Clegg and the Liberal Democrats, it’s a good start in explaining why, as is this Michael Wollf piece. Plus, Gary Gibbon of Channel 4 News speculates about just what senior News International executives were doing in the office block that the Independent shares with the Daily Mail.

Back to party politics, though, and I wonder if this decentralisation of campaigning might lead to a whole new way of organising political parties in the UK? Does the traditional membership model really work when you don’t need to jump through committee hoops to run your campaign, you just need to start a Facebook group or come up with a Twitter hashtag and see who rallies around. Ken MacLeod discussed some of these changes in his Morning Star interview this week, and even though he’s coming at it from the perspective of the Left, there are similarities:

MacLeod’s analysis of far-left movements is far from uncritical. He points out that left-wing movements have been slow to embrace new technologies, in part because the internet “challenges a set of Leninist assumptions that a lot of far-left groups had about how discussions must and should be conducted.

“A lot of the formal rules of the left are still based on 19th-century communications technology – the idea that revolutionary politics are built around a top-level party line set down by a newspaper, which everyone has to agree with. The internet negates that process,” he says, adding hastily that “the Star has a head start, in that it allows in voices from outside the party.”

Probably something for more thought after the election, though.

One other thing that’s been on my mind today is A Very British Coup. I caught a bit of it a few weeks ago when Yesterday were repeating it, and am glad to discover that Channel 4 have made the whole thing available on YouTube and 4OD. In AVBC, the establishment and the press attempt to bring down a radical Prime Minister who rises to power after a major scandal in the City, and I’m wondering if Chris Mullin was being optimistic in assuming the press would wait until after Harry Perkins was in office.

Right, that’s all for now – did deliver 40 letters for the campaign this morning, taking the total there to 2,410, and am down to quite a bit of canvassing tomorrow to boost the figure there quite a lot. More commentary after tonight’s debate, when I’m fully expecting Gordon Brown to tell us he’s been reading the Twitter and discovered it’s all Nick Clegg’s fault.

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For entirely ego-driven reasons, I feel the world needs to know how this morning’s Twitter meme began:

chickyog: Morning all. has Nick Robinson exploded yet?
nickjbarlow: @chickyog No, but when he does, the Telegraph and Mail will claim it’s Nick Clegg’s fault.
chickyog: @nickjbarlow Ha. I feel a meme coming on.
chickyog: Just stubbed my toe #nickcleggsfault

Oh, and my favourite thing to blame Nick Clegg for so far? This:

Chinese Democracy took 15 years because Nick Clegg was arguing with Axl about adopting proportional representation.

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