5 Things Nick Clegg Could Learn From Peter Capaldi

Doctor Who returns to BBC One tonight with the first full appearance of Peter Capaldi’s Twelfth Doctor. It’s been noted many times that Liberal Democrats tend to be bigger fans of Doctor Whoand SF in general – than members of other parties, though to the best of my knowledge Nick Clegg hasn’t yet talked in public about his own views on the show. With that in mind, I’ve come up with five things that I think the new Doctor and his career could teach Nick Clegg:

1) What it’s like to be a professional actor

Clegg used to act at school and appears to have enjoyed the experience, but didn’t carry on this interest when he got older. Capaldi has had a thirty year career as an actor, and he could probably explain to Clegg just what it’s like, perhaps sating Clegg’s curiosity if he’s ever wondered what things would be like for him if he’d carried on acting.

2) What it’s like to win an Oscar

As someone not involved in film-making, Clegg hasn’t even been to the Academy Awards, let alone won one. Capaldi has won one for his short film Franz Kafka’s It’s A Wonderful Life, and if Clegg hasn’t already seen or read one of the interviews with Capaldi where he talks about the experience, Capaldi could tell him what it was like.

3) How to operate the TARDIS

There are no TARDIS console props in Whitehall or Liberal Democrat HQ in Great George Street. I’m also reliably informed that Clegg doesn’t have one in his home or his constituency office in Sheffield. Capaldi, of course, has been a long time fan of the show and now he’s playing the Doctor, he’s likely to be much more knowledgeable about its operation than Clegg.

4) The qualities needed for a successful event and travel organiser

Capaldi’s just come back from promoting his new series on the Doctor Who World Tour. Clegg’s currently recruiting for a Visits and Events Officer. Capaldi could no doubt inform him of some of the things he thinks are the qualities of a person organising a successful event and travel plans.

5) How an actor might approach playing the role of Clegg in a film

Channel 4 have announced that they’re making a film about Clegg and the formation of the coalition. In his career, Capaldi has played several real people on screen including Cardinal Richelieu, King Charles I and Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger. He could no doubt tell Clegg what it’s like to play a real person and how he prepares for the role, but with the caveat that the actor cast as Clegg may have an entirely different process.

That’s five things Clegg could learn from Capaldi, probably over a pleasant lunch somewhere.

Some thoughts on Peter Capaldi

I wrote on a forum a couple of weeks ago, when the first rumours about Peter Capaldi becoming the Doctor that “I’d love it to be Capaldi, but I don’t think we live in an awesome enough universe for that to happen.” Obviously, I was wrong and the universe remains an awesome and wonderful place where things like that can happen.

Obviously, I’m excited that he’s going to be playing the Doctor and not just because it means that the actor playing the Doctor is older than me again. I only discovered recently just how much of a fan of the series he is, beating even David Tennant for fannish credentials, but the reason his name got me excited was that he’s an incredibly talented actor. While he’s become famous as Malcolm Tucker, he has a huge range as an actor, and most of his roles have been a long way away from the rage and anger of Tucker. Indeed, having seen his interview on Sunday, and had a look back at some of his other roles, it’s clear how much of a performance Tucker is. Tucker’s voice is a deeper and more guttural than Capaldi’s own, and his physicality is completely different.

In combination with his comment on Sunday about not quite seeing the Twelfth Doctor in the mirror yet, I think it would be foolish to try and assume what sort of Doctor he will portray. The Doctor is a very interesting part for an actor, as a lot of different approaches to it have worked over the years. At one extreme, there’s the Tom Baker approach, where the character becomes a larger version of the actor, while at the other, there’s the style that Patrick Troughton pioneered of creating a distinct character and playing that role. I think the new series started with Eccleston taking the Troughton approach, but Tennant and Smith had moved it closer to the Baker style, but Capaldi’s comments make me think the pendulum will be swinging back.

The other thought that occurs to me is that by the time his first proper series as the Doctor starts (around Autumn next year, I believe, after the regeneration at the end of this year), the new series will have been around for almost nine and a half years. To put that into perspective, that’s the time in the original series between An Unearthly Child and The Green Death and longer than the gap between the TV movie and Rose. With a whole new take on the Doctor and a chance for everyone to recharge and think about how to take the series forward for the next fifty years, don’t be surprised if the whole series has a different feel when the Twelfth Doctor’s in the TARDIS.