Tag Archives

Archive of posts published in the tag: political science

Can one tweet change a person’s mind? No, but a barrage of them might

There’s lots of annoying responses going around to the issue of social media bots, but one of the most annoying to me is the canard of ‘it’s all stupid, they can’t be influential because who’s going to change their mind on how to…

No, polling companies aren’t trying to turn us into fascists

There was a minor social media storm yesterday evening when some people shared a question that YouGov are currently asking in one of their surveys. People were asked on a scale from strongly disagree to strongly agree how much they agreed with the…

Worth Reading 187: Californian murder

Workplace coercion – “Why are people who profess to be classical liberals apparently so indifferent to workplace tyranny?” asks Chris Dillow. Why the 2016 Election Will Be One of the Most Pivotal Moments of Our Time – It’s fun to laugh at the…

Closing the Overton Window

It’s become quite common for political pundits and online commentators to talk sagely about the “Overton Window” when they’re talking about public opinion. (Click here for a sampling of recent uses of it) It’s presented as an immutable law of political science –…

2015 General Election Day 29: My intentions are getting firmer

Let’s start with a couple of tales from the doorsteps, and see which one you find the most amusing. Both of them are from Devon, so maybe they do elections differently down there. First, we have the Greens of Exeter with a complaint:…

Receive-Accept-Sample: How people form opinions

As we’re now into the election campaign, the entire purpose of which is to get people to form a certain set of opinions and then act on them on May 7th, I thought it was about time I went back to doing another…

Worth Reading 157: Carthago Delenda Est

What ISIS Really Wants – Long but very good piece about the history, ideology and theology of the Islamic State. The national interest demands it, let’s ban golf courses – If you think solar farms are a waste of productive land, why do…

Worth Reading 139: Hadrian’s tomb

Russell Brand and our political culture – Chris Dillow argues that Brand gets publicity because our political culture as a whole is anti-intellectual. Stuffing envelopes and getting stuffed – An alternative take on Liberal Democrat campaigning by Alex Harrowell. The Laborers Who Keep…

Worth Reading 127: Still with both arms

How political science conquered Washington – Relevant to my interests and things I’ve talked about before: how political commentary in the US is taking more notice of academic research. Victim-blaming: an all-pervading curse – How a culture of blaming the victim lets the…