What You Can Get Away With » politics

24 Hours In Any City In The World – “The perfect, meticulously-searched guide to Any City In The World for people who, for some bizarre reason, have only allocated 24 hours to explore it.”
4 Things We Should Remember When Arguing About Politics – Useful perspective from Cracked.
As Millenials Shun Cars, Boston Rethinks Its Transportation System – “when I was learning to drive, the idea of driving out in the country and even driving around town and not spending a lot of time sitting in traffic was actually something of a reality. As Americans started driving more and more over the years, there’s no more open road in the United States. Almost everyone who’s driving is driving places that are pretty darn congested.”
A short history of swivel-eyed loons – Chris Brooke delves into Lexis and finds the moment when the swivel-eyed and the loon were first bound together in political commentary.
What Nigel Farage told British expats in Spain – Jon Danzig picks apart a succession of UKIP arguments.

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Here’s 2013′s first set of links:

In an EU referendum, what does NO mean? – Jon Worth looks at Cameron’s latest European strategy and wonders where it might lead.
Behaving in politics as if we were normal people – “prefigurative action” – Jon Worth again, this time on the disconnect between politics and real life.
20 obsolete English words that should make a comeback – It might jargogle at first, and using them could make you seem ludibrious, but ignore those who brabble about the perissology and think how illecebrous it could make you. You might kench at least.
Happy New Year – Jim Bliss explains the lifecycle of a typical blog in a few paragraphs.
Crazy Cat Person – Just a nice story of adopting rescued cats. See? I can share non-cynical heart-warming stuff too.

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Quite a few from the US this time, but it’s been a busy week there.

Doing politics in plain sight – Written from a Labour perspective, but I think relevant to everyone. “We all talk about wanting politicians with some experience of life outside Westminster. That shouldn’t be simply the first act of your life before giving oneself over to politics completely. All politicians should have the option of having a normal life outside of politics, and we need to look at how we change the way we do business to make that happen. If we don’t we will only be represented by – and representative of – the obsessed. Making politics a more attracticve option will also help to reduce the barrier between those who involved and those they represent. At the moment, few people can see why anyone would want to put themselves through it, other than for financial gain.”
When quants tell stories – A look at how the Obama campaign got its message out, and how much it tailored the different messages different groups received.
Why Americans actually voted for a Democratic House – Another triumph for First Past The Post in the US. Democrats get more votes; Republicans keep control of the House of Representatives by a large majority. (via)
Inside Team Romney’s whale of an IT meltdown – Another look behind the scenes of the US election, this time on how Romney’s much vaunted wonderful IT system for getting out the vote failed.
Attention henchmen! Voting machines and other flawed conspiracies – From before the election, but an interesting look at the problems of voting machines by David Brin

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Take a number – Outside magazine reports on some of the deaths to have occurred amongst people climbing Everest this year. (via)
Policing The Land – in honour of #ldconf – Sarah Brown rewrites The Land to make it fit the brave new world of accreditation and security theatre.
Clegg and coalition six months on – James Graham looks at what’s happened in the Lib Dems six months after he left. Long, but well worth reading.
Global Warming’s Terrifying New Math – A couple of months old, but I’ve only just seen it. Some figures and projections in there that will keep you up at night.
One big rule if you’re writing about politics – Andrew Hickey has a simple rule to work out who’s worth reading and who’s not.

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