Yes, yes, I’m doing these again. It’s almost like I’ve decided to try being a blogger again for a while, isn’t it?

Stephen King: Tax Me, for F@%&’s Sake! – A wonderfully angry rant about what rich people get away with in American.
The rise of gernotocracy? – (pdf file) A report from the Intergenerational Foundation on the democratic deficit between different age groups, with suggestions for how to combat it. Whether you agree with the recommendations or not, there’s a lot of food for thought within it.
Bill Hicks on Freedom of Speech – Wonderful letter from the late, great comedian to a priest who’d complained about Channel 4 showing Revelations
Spoilers – Charles Stross responds to some of the reviews and comments on his excellent novel Rule 34
. He’s not complaining about them (‘we have a technical term for an author who argues with reviewers: “idiot”‘) but pointing out some interesting additional information on the book and its background that’s interesting if you’ve read it. And if you haven’t, then you should give it a try.
The Economist fails the Turing Test again – Crooked Timber’s Henry Farrell explains how to automate the writing of Economist articles.

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2011 books: Catch up

Oops, haven’t written here for a while, and have also slipped behind on the regular reading too. Only three books finished in the few weeks since my last post, and they were:

30) A Storm of Swords by George RR Martin

The longest part yet of A Song Of Ice And Fire, and would perhaps have counted as two books if I wasn’t reading the single Kindle edition. Still very good, and an interesting depiction of a world descending into hell, with each chink of light ruthlessly extinguished as another plot comes to light.

31) Rule 34 by Charles Stross

The sequel to Halting State, Stross returns to near-future Scotland for a crime story that’s equal parts Brookmyre and Orwell. A very interesting extrapolation of current trends in society and policing, laden down with the usual rapid-fire of ideas that you expect from Stross.

32) I, Patridge: We Need To Talk About Alan by Alan Partridge (Armando Ianucci, Steve Coogan et al

The autobiography of a broadcasting legend, whose career I’ve followed since he burst to national prominence on Radio 4′s On The Hour and Knowing Me, Knowing You. It reveals just how this major talent’s career has been blighted by the jealousy of lesser talents and the short-sightedness of broadcasting management (usually at the BBC). Includes a harrowing account of his descent into Toblerone addiction – I, for one, will never look on their chocolate-honey-nougat prisms with quite the same innocence from now on – though needless to say, he has the last laugh.

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